Non-Chemical Ways to Control Growth of Moss on Concrete Flooring

Moss

Unlike most plants, moss doesn’t rely on soil to survive. In fact, these plants can flourish on concrete surfaces by attaching their rhizoids (root hairs that anchor the plants to the ground) to absorb nutrients.

Although they can be unsightly, moss plants afford some benefits. For instance, a moss wall can improve air quality. But, if moss grows on the floor, the plants pose a threat to safety. According to All Gleaming Clean, moss formation can be a slip-hazard, which, if not attended to, may cause injuries.

The most effective way to remove stubborn moss is to call in the experts. But, if the growth is in its early stages, you can consider using non-chemical ways to control it.

Surface Clean-up

Moss can form between paving. What you can do is run a sharp knife across the cracks to dislodge the plant. If you don’t want to crouch, you can use a brush with a long handle and wire bristles. Brush the cracks and the moss will detach from the concrete.

A pressure washer also effectively removes moss and algae. Just make sure that you dry the surface thoroughly after washing so you don’t exacerbate the problem of slipperiness.

Additionally, areas with loose gravel should be raked to prevent the growth of moss and weeds, for that matter. If moss is growing wild on your garden steps, the quick fix is to spread coarse sand over the area to make it less slippery.

Moisture Management

Because moss thrives and spread in damp areas, the best way to prevent its growth on a concrete floor is to keep the surface dry.

Improve drainage in the area by digging out shallow channels along the surrounding edges. Then, fill the channels with coarse gravel for absorption of runoff water. If the area has overhanging plants, prune them to allow the entry of sunlight and wind for quicker drying.

For a long-term solution to moss problem, regular maintenance is the key. If there are cracks in any concrete area, have them repaired as soon as possible to eliminate a potential foothold for moss. But, if the moss situation has become severe, better call in the experts.